Julian Cope presents JAPROCKSAMPLER.COM

Recent Posts

I have never heard this 'obscure psychedelic group', as internet bloggers have described them. However, they are reputed to have released one album.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Sakuro “Kant” Watanabe (also drummer Maruhachibu)
Kohji “Tohchan” Miura
Reck
Chiko-Hige
Juno
Yoshiyuki Hida

The early ‘70s street music of Maru Sankaku Shikaku, whose random bells, flute, and remedial percussion flaylings (though horribly more-ish in a rent-a-freak Noggin the Nog meets Towser way) are still more like the Godz than the deep theta space obliterations that Taj Mahal Travellers achieved.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Toshiro Mayuzumi was an experimental composer who was instrumental in providing a bridge between the Western avant-garde and traditional Japanese music. He began composing in the mid-1940s and, although his early compositions were almost exclusively Western influenced, by the mid-1950s he began to favour the traditional sounds of his native country as well as the spiritual sounds of Buddhism. His 1955 album X, Y, Z is of particular note as it was the first Japanese example of music concrete. He went on to score music for theatre groups and films (over 100), and won several prestigious prizes throughout his career. Toshiro Mayuzumi died in April 1997, aged 68.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Four- or five-piece band featuring Kuni Kawachi on organ, piano and Mellotron.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Keitaro Miho - composer
Masahiko Satoh – piano, percussion
Ryo Kawasaki – guitar
Akira Ishikawa – drums
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Kan Mikami is an avant-garde protest folk singer, influenced by the spirit of John Lennon, Bob Dylan and David Peel but through an entirely Japanese filter. As an angry student, he released his first album in 1970 and became an instant star and hero. He recorded a dozen albums for the PSF label.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Takehisa Kosugi is essential to the very fibre of Japrocksampler, which deals with his career is extensive detail throughout the book.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Lily was a twenty-year-old folk singer when her first album was released on May 5th 1972. Her husky voice and gentle style captured the hearts of the new Japanese folk scene, and many attempts have been made to cross her cult over to an English-speaking audience. Unfortunately, Lily's music is not much cop, and her lyrics - sung all in Japanese - make it unlikely that she will transcend her national boundaries.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
Keiji Haino – vocals
Hiroyuki Takahashi – drums
Akira Asano – piano
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007
In 1971, the festival band M was everywhere, playing alongside such luminaries as Creation, Too Much, Murahatchibu and Miki Curtis’ newly heavy version of Samurai. In early April 1971, M performed at the celebrated ‘Rock Invitation Number One’, at Hibiya Outdoor Hall, thereafter being asked back for ‘Rock Invitation Number Two’, on June 26th. Later the same year, M recorded a self-titled LP for RCA Records said to have contained several cover versions. Thereafter, the band split. In 2002CE, the re-issue label Hagakure released one of their festival shows under the name 1971 LIVE.
Posted by Julian Cope, Sep 01, 2007